Devoran First World War Casualties, K to P

Devoran war memorial names M to W

Devoran war memorial names M to W

E. Marshall

Private Edwin Marshall, SS/14236, 18th Labour Company, Army Service Corps died aged 39 on 13 August 1915.

Edwin is remembered on the ASC panels 199, 233-236 or 331 on the Helles Memorial to the missing of The Dardanelles and Gallipoli Campaign in Turkey, having no known grave and in his case lost at sea on the troopship Royal Edward.

Edwin Marshall of Devcran (c/o Olwen Martin / Ancestry)

Edwin Marshall of Devoran (c/o Olwen Martin / Ancestry)

 

Bob Richards believes that, along with one of Bob’s relatives from the Opie family, Edwin Marshall was one of around 1000 servicemen drowned within minutes when the troopship Royal Edward was torpedoed and sunk on 13 August 1915. Over 70 Cornish servicemen in the ASC and Labour Corps were onboard.

Royal Edward postcard image (Source: Wikipedia)

Royal Edward postcard image (Source: Wikipedia)

Bob Richards and others are interviewed about their research into the loss of the Royal Edward in the BBC radio Cornwall World War One programmes http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p022v86t

Bob’s research into Cornishmen involved in the Royal Edward disaster has found a reference to Edwin “reported as missing” in the West Briton of 9 September 1915 that ends “with his wife and five children a good deal of sympathy is felt in their anxiety.”

Edwin Marshall has no known grave and is remembered on the Helles Memorial to the Missing of the Dardanelles Campaign, Turkey. (Image: www.cwgc.co.uk website)

Edwin Marshall has no known grave and is remembered on the Helles Memorial to the Missing of the Dardanelles Campaign, Turkey. (Image: http://www.cwgc.co.uk website)

Edwin was the son of Mr and Mrs William Marshall of Carnon Mine, Devoran Cornwall. He was married around 1901 to Eveline Louisa Marshall (nee Pearce) of Point, Devoran, Cornwall and had five children Flossie (b.1902), William Edwin (b.1904), Elsie Louisa (b.1906/7), Bertram John Roland (b.1908) and Leah Vera Marshall (1909 -1994). All the children were born in Devoran or registered in Truro.

Tony Dyson’s 2007 research notes that Edwin Marshall is believed by Bill Marshall of Carnon Mine to have been a cousin of his father.

There is more about the Royal Edward on the Gallipoli Association forum webpage.

There is ongoing work to find out why some of the Royal Edward casualties received full campaign medals  but not others. http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/20-000-48-bold-Cornishmen-know-reason/story-23054353-detail/story.html

G. Martin

I have not so far managed to trace this Devoran casualty G. Martin. There are hundreds of G. Martins listed on the CWGC website, none with obvious Devoran links so far. Any information gratefully received via the comment form.

There  were  several Martin families in the area at the time including at Belmont Terrace. Interestingly the  sculptor or maker of the memorial was an H.J. Martin, Devoran (1872-1952) – any relation? 

Sculptor and builder H.J. Martin's name plate at the base of the Devoran War Memorial.

Sculptor and builder H.J. Martin’s name plate at the base of the Devoran War Memorial.

Herbert J. Martin, the Memorial Cross Sculptor

Herbert J. Martin, Devoran was born in  Bissoe, 1872, the son of John Martin, a builder. Herbert   died at 2 Belmont Terrace, Devoran  in  1952, survived by his wife Hilda (who was born in Feock in 1872).  In the 1891 to 1911 census returns his job is variously ‘builder’ or ‘sculptor’. Herbert was one of six children – Ada  b.1875, Laura  b.1884, Ethel Hilda b.1885-1965, Edward b. 1887, Lilian b.1889, Olive b. 1895.

W.D. Pascoe

Gunner William Donald Pascoe, 86574, 13th Reserve Battery, Royal Field Artillery died on 20 April 1915, aged 19. Born in Feock in October 1896, he is buried at grave D31 in the small military section of 164 casualties buried in (Christ Church) Military Cemetery, Hampshire. He enlisted in Truro and died on Home Service in Alexandra Hotel Cosham. In 1911, his occupation is given as a ‘newsboy’. Bob Richards’ newspaper research (West Briton, 29 April 1915) indicates that he died of “cerebro-spinal fever” and was formerly an apprentice at W. Visick’s and Sons, Basset Works, Devoran.

W D Pascoe died on 'Home Service' and is buried at Portsdown Cemetery, Hampshire.

W D Pascoe died on ‘Home Service’ and is buried at Portsdown Cemetery, Hampshire.

He is also remembered on the headstone of his parents in Devoran churchyard “who died at Cosham, April 20 1915 aged 18 and a half.” A photograph exists of their Devoran family grave

William was the son of William Williams Pascoe (b. St Agnes, 1866, died January 12th 1926), a postman in Devoran. William’s mother Alice M. Pascoe (nee Dingle) was born in St. Gluvias in 1870 and died aged 84, 24 February 1955. They lived in (Lemon) Market Street, Devoran.
William’s parents married in 1895 and had three other children. Netta May Pascoe was born in 1899 (and became a WW1 land girl see our Life in Deoran WW1 post), Llewelyn Maxwell who served in the Royal Navy in WW1 (1899-1982) and Lillian Annie Pascoe, b. 31 December 1900 (registered January 1901) who died 12 May 1990, aged 89 years, beloved widow of John Standford, as recorded on the family grave.

J.P. Paynter

The most likely match is James Pearce Paynter, Private 34289, 11th Battalion, Worcester Regiment, died on 30th March 1917. He is buried at plot F1286, Karasouli Military Cemetrey, Greece.  This cemetery was linked to Casualty Clearing stations on the Doiran Front in Greece.

Karasouli cemetery in Greece. Image: www.cwgc.org

Karasouli cemetery in Greece. Image: http://www.cwgc.org

I can find no obvious Devoran connection at the moment for this J.P. Paynter. He is listed on the CWGC website as  the husband of Ethel H.G. Paynter, 3 St George’s Terrace, Stonehouse, Plymouth. He was born at Little Par in Cornwall.

J P Paynter's headstone, Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, The War Graves Photographic Project)

J P Paynter’s headstone, Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, The War Graves Photographic Project)

Bob Richards notes that he is also listed on the Tywardeath War Memorial. Tony Dyson’s 2007 research notes that the Worcestershire Regiment website lists Private Paynter’s place of death as Salonika, Macedonia. The Karasouli cemetery is noted as having many concentration burials brought in from surrounding areas.

W.T.B. Peters
Private William Thomas Ball Peters, 72511, 10th Battalion, Sherwood Forestrs (Notts and Derby Regiment) died of wounds aged 26 on 27th August 1918.
Peters is buried in grave B24, Fienvillers British Cemetery, Somme, France. This small cemetery of 124 burials was made by the 38th and 34th Casualty Clearing Station, Fienvillers between May and September 1918.

Fienvillers British Cemetery (Image: www.cwgc.org)

Fienvillers British Cemetery (Image: http://www.cwgc.org)

Before his transfer to the ‘Sherwood Foresters’, according to his surviving army service records, W.T.B. Peters (resident in 1914/5 in Shulock Road, Hampstead as a Milk Carrier) had a strange wartime career in the early Royal Flying Corps as 12357, Kite Balloon Section, RFC. Kite Balloons were a tethered balloon for two observers, maintained by a large ground team – see the kite balloon entry in the Mary Evans picture library blog. .

He joined on 11 / 12 November 1915 at South Farnborough and served in the RFC until 8 March 1916 when he was transferred into the Army in France. His RFC training in December 1915 was at Hare Park Camp, Curragh in Ireland, an RFC training depot.

W T B Peters headstone, Fienvillers British Cemetery, Somme, France (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, the War Graves Photographic Project)

W T B Peters headstone, Fienvillers British Cemetery, Somme, France (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, the War Graves Photographic Project)

W T B Peters lies in Fienvillers British Cemetery, Somme, France (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, the War Graves Photographic Project)

W T B Peters lies in Fienvillers British Cemetery, Somme, France (Image copyright: TWGPP/CWGC, the War Graves Photographic Project)

Born in Perranwell, Cornwall in 1893, Peters was the only son of Thomas (b.1864) and Mary Annie Peters (nee Davey, b.1867) of Ash Tree Cottage, Carnon Downs, Cornwall.

Thomas his father was listed on the 1911 census as an egg merchant and farmer. Obviously a family business, for William his son is an 18 year old Assistant in Wholesale Egg Merchant ‘looking after warehouse’ in 1911, living in Gospel Oak, NW London.

William had two sisters to mourn his loss, Dora Annie Peters (born Feock, 14 March 1899 – died Truro, March 1973). She married Leslie R.J. Hannam (1891- 1921) in 1918. His other sister, Ida Mary Peters was born c. 1907/8 in Hampstead when the family were working in or visiting London.

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3 thoughts on “Devoran First World War Casualties, K to P

  1. Pingback: Remembering William Donald Pascoe died 20 April 1915 | Devoran War Memorial Cornwall

  2. Pingback: Remembering Edwin Marshall of Devoran and others lost on the troopship SS Royal Edward | Devoran War Memorial Cornwall

  3. Pingback: Devoran men of 1914 MCMXIV – first volunteers and old sweats | Devoran War Memorial Cornwall

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